Friday, September 22nd, 2017

Course Descriptions


“I” indicates fall semester; “II” indicates spring semester; “S” indicates summer terms. Courses may be offered in semesters not listed if there is a demand.

Numbers in parentheses follow each course description. The first number identifies the required number of lecture hours per week for a regular semester. The second number identifies the required number of lab hours per week for a regular semester. The third number identifies the amount of student semester credit hours (SSCH) awarded for the course. For example, a listing of “HIST 1113 World Civilizations I (3,0,3)” would mean that it meets in class for three hours per week for a regular semester (15 weeks), has no lab, and is awarded three SSCH.

Courses with descriptions followed by “offered on demand” generally will be offered each semester there is sufficient interest to merit it.

The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) course index number is indicated at the end of the course description for applicable courses.  Courses not having an ACTS number may also transfer.  Please consult the receiving institution for complete transfer information.

Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS)

The Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contains information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credits and the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu).

Note:  The College reserves the right to cancel a class under the following conditions: fewer than ten (10) students enroll; a qualified instructor is not available; necessary facilities, equipment, or materials are not available; or a reasons that would otherwise make the teaching and learning in the class inefficient or ineffective.

ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I (I, II) A study of fundamental accounting theory and procedures for sole proprietorship with emphasis on the accounting equation, the double-entry accounting system, financial statements, end-of-period adjusting and closing procedures, and internal control. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ACCT 2003

 

ACCT 2113 Principles of Accounting II (I,II) A continuation of Principles of Accounting I with emphasis on accounting for manufacturing corporations, differentiating between cost flow systems, analyzing and recording cost transactions, preparing cost reports, analyzing accounting information and understanding the budgeting process. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ACCT 2013

 

ACCT 2203 Payroll Accounting (II) Introduces students to the major tasks of payroll accounting. Examines employment practices; federal, state, and local government laws and regulations; internal controls; and various payroll accounting forms and records. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in ACCT 2103 Principles of Accounting I. (3,0,3)

 

ARTS 1003 Sketching And Drawing I (I,II) Teaches the techniques of drawing in pencil, charcoal, and ink and provides instruction in the application of art principles to drawing. (3,0,3)

 

ARTS 1013 Sketching and Drawing II  (I,II) Advanced problems in drawing, group composition, drawing with colored media, and experimental techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1003. (3,0,3)

 

ARTS 1023 Painting

This course will introduce students to the art of painting. Students will learn painting techniques, color theory, and proper care and use of painting supplies. Students will learn to communicate through their art and to produce paintings in various subjects including realistic and abstract portraits, still life, and landscapes. (3,0,3)

 

ARTS 2003 Art Appreciation (I,II,S) This course will introduce students to the visual arts.  However, rather than simply learning the names and dates of artists and artworks, the students will analyze the art for its meanings and messages by analysis of symbolic representation using critical thinking. Students will put the art into context with the society in which it was created.  Students will examine the social, political, and religious influences on art and the effect art has had on the culture that produced it. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ARTA 1003

 

ARTS 2013 Introduction to Film This course will introduce students to the filmmaking art.  Students will analyze films’ meanings and messages by analysis of symbolic representation using critical thinking.  Students will put the films into context with the cultural, societal, and political influences of the day and evaluate how the films attempted to shape these factors in society. The students will also study the historical context of the films and their aesthetic qualities. (3,0,3)

 

ARTS 280X Special Topics in Arts Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

ARTS 290X Internship This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, overisght by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern site’s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4)

 

BIOL 1003 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology I (I,II) Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a study of the structure of the human body and functions with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, reproductive, and endocrine systems. This course is a non-lab human anatomy and physiology course which meets the requirements for many allied health professions. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English), ACT 19 (Reading); or COMPASS 83 (Reading), 80 (Writing) (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 1013 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology II (I,II) Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a continuation of BIOL 1003 with emphasis on the circulatory, digestive, urinary, nervous, and respiratory systems. This course is a non-lab human anatomy and physiology course which meets the requirements for many allied health professions. Prerequisite: “C” or above in BIOL 1003. (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 1201 Biology Lab (I) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (0,3,1)

 

BIOL 1203 Biology (Lecture Only) (I) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 1204 Biology (I,II,S) A morphological, physiological, and taxonomic survey of the plant and animal kingdoms with emphasis on basic biological concepts. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 1014

 

BIOL 1244 General Botany (II, Even years) Botany is a study of the plant kingdom, including the structure, physiology and phylogeny of plants. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 1034

 

BIOL 1254 Zoology (I, Odd Years) Zoology is a survey of the major taxa of the animal kingdom using a phylogenetic and systemic approach.  Major physiological systems will be covered for each phylum with emphasis on their evolution, structure and function.  Laboratory is designed to compliment the lecture component of the course and includes dissection. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 1054

 

BIOL 2203 Nutrition (I,II) A study of the fundamental principles of human nutrition and diet that emphasizes normal nutrition as a basis for making diet adaptations in the treatment of disease. (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 2211 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems.  Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection.  Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English) ACT 19 (Reading); or COMPASS 83 (Reading), 80 (Writing). (0,3,1)

 

BIOL 2213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lecture (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems. Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English); ACT 19 (Reading); or COMPASS 83 (Reading), 80 (Writing). (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 2214 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology I is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cellular processes, tissues, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and endocrine systems.  Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection.  Prerequisite: ACT 19 (English); ACT 19 (Reading); or COMPASS 83 (Reading), 80 (Writing). (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 2404

 

BIOL 2221 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems.  Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite:   BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (0,3,1)

 

BIOL 2223 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lecture (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems.  Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. Prerequisite:   BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (3,0,3)

 

BIOL 2224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (I,II,S) Human Anatomy and Physiology II is a detailed study of the structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the circulatory system and blood, lymphatic system, digestive system and nutrition, urinary system and excretion, nervous system and special senses, respiratory, and reproductive systems.  Students must also complete laboratory exercises to include dissection. . Prerequisite:   BIOL 2214, or permission of instructor. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 2414

 

BIOL 2234 Microbiology (I,II,S) A study of the general characteristics of microorganisms with emphasis on the role of microorganisms in areas related to human health and disease. Prerequisite:  ACT 19 (English,), ACT 19 (Reading); or COMPASS 83 (Reading), 80 (Writing). (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  BIOL 2004

 

BUSS 1203 Introduction to Business (I,II) Surveys business activities of individual, national, and international scope. A comparison of economic systems with emphasis on the free enterprise system including forms of ownership, organization and management, labor relations, production, marketing, finance, and legal and regulatory influences. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  BUSI 1013

 

BUSS 1213 Business Communications (II) A study of the principles of effective business letter writing and effective oral communications related to today’s business environment. Prerequisite: Passing CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers with a C or better. Prerequisite or Co requisite: ENGL 1013 Composition I. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  BUSI 2013

 

BUSS 1253 Records Management (I,II) Provides studies in records management, filing, supplies, and equipment. Emphasis will be placed on alphabetic, geographic, numeric, chronological subject sorting, filing, and retrieving. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2003 Medical Transcription (II) This course provides training in the transcribing of mailable documents from recordings using a microcomputer. Prerequisite: Passing CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers with a C or better. Prerequisite or Co requisite: ENGL 1013 Composition I. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2023 Business Organization and Management (I,II) This course focuses on the importance of professional development in the application of administrative practices and procedures used in today’s office. It also focuses on techniques and skills in the principal areas of management, placing emphasis on leadership, communications, and decision-making as related to the office environment. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2103 Human Resource Management (I) This course is a study of the principles, methods, and procedures related to the effective utilization of human resources in organizations. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2143 Legal Terminology (II) This course provides the student with the basic terminology that is specific to the legal environment. This course covers the concepts of legal terminology from all angles, including definition, spelling, pronunciation, punctuation, capitalization and usage. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2203 Business Law (I,II) This course provides studies in some of the basic characteristics of the American system of free enterprise and legal obligations and rights of the individual. Topics include contracts, personal property, commercial property, agency and employment, business organization, and real property. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  BLAW 2003

 

BUSS 2213 Medical Office Billing (I) In this course students follow the flow of information as patients are scheduled and seen in a medical office, through procedure posting, billing and collections. Concepts discussed are followed by immediate application using a generic practice management software, which helps users prepare to work with other similar commercial software being used in medical offices today. Standard procedure and diagnostic coding are referenced and discussed as they relate to the billing process. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2303 Personal Finance (II) This course is a study of the basic principles of personal management of banking services, consumer credit, insurance, real estate, savings and investments, pensions and annuity plans, and estate planning. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2313 Business Statistics (I, II) This course provides an introduction of statistical methods used in studying business and economic data, descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous distributions, estimation, sampling concepts and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2323 Business Calculus (II) This course provides an introduction to the concepts of differentiation and integration. Emphasis will be placed on applications of calculus in business, economics, and accounting. Prerequisite: A “C” or better in MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 2703 Independent Study Research and independent investigation in areas of business under the supervision of the instructor. Prerequisites: Sophomore – second semester standing and permission of advisor and instructor. Offered upon demand. (3,0,3)

 

BUSS 280X Special Topics in Business Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

BUSS 2903 Internship A cooperative program between the student, the College, and business and industry to begin to develop the skills necessary to be successful in the job environment. Students attend class to discuss job interviews and resume writing, interpersonal skills, soft skills and professional etiquette prior to placement. Students are placed by advisors; the intern site will provide on-the-job training as an extension of the classroom. Internship is designed to permit students the experience of an actual job in their chosen fields of study. Prerequisite: Final semester of enrollment in the AAS: Business Administration degree, approval by advisor, and 3.0 GPA. (2,2,3)

 

CARD 1001 Introduction to Dysrhythmia (I) An introduction to the dysrhythmias found in cardiology and their treatments. This course is fast paced, and it is recommended that students have some background in cardiac dysfunction. The design of this course is to meet the needs of individuals attempting Advanced Cardiac Life Support for the first time and to meet the needs of individuals wanting to pursue or update skills in electrocardiography. COMPASS requirements – Pre-Algebra 41 or Algebra 26, Reading 83, English 80. (1,0,1)

 

CARE 1113 Kitchen Products (I) This course will provide an overview of kitchen products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. Course topics will include principles of operation, installation of, and components associated with each product. (1,5,3)

 

CARE 1123 Laundry Products (I) This course will provide an overview of Laundry products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. Course topics will include principles of operation, installation of, and components associated with each product. (1,5,3)

 

CARE 1233 Troubleshooting and Repair (II) This course will provide an overview of kitchen and Laundry products as they relate to residential and commercial applications. This will include an understanding of the relation of the components and controls associated with each product. Students will focus primarily on troubleshooting and repairing all kitchen and laundry products at the component level. (1,5,3)

 

CARE 1243 Basic Carpentry and Painting (II) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, tools, and methods associated with the basic carpentry and painting knowledge and skills required in the maintenance and repair of commercial and residential facilities. (1,5,3)

 

CARE 1253 Basic Plumbing (II) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, tools, and methods associated with the basic plumbing knowledge and skills required in the maintenance and repair of commercial and residential facilities. (1,5,3)

 

CHEM 1004 Introduction to Chemistry (I) Introduction to Chemistry is a survey of chemistry.  Emphasis will be placed on inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry and biological chemistry.  Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and theory, periodic law, bonding, stoichiometry calculations, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, radioactivity, organic nomenclature and reactions, and biological chemistry and reactions. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  CHEM 1004

 

CHEM 1111 Chemistry I Lab (Lab only to accompany CHEM 1113 for the lecture portion) (I).  An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry.  Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: “C” or above in MATH 1033 OR ACT Math 19 or above OR COMPASS AL 41 or above. (0,3,1)

 

CHEM 1113 Chemistry Lecture (Lecture to accompany CHEM 1111 for the lab portion) (I).  An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry.  Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: “C” or above in MATH 1033 OR ACT Math 19 or above OR COMPASS AL 41 or above. (3,0,3)

 

CHEM 1114 Chemistry I (I).  An algebra-based chemistry course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry.  Among the topics to be covered are measurement, physical and chemical properties, atomic structure and quantum theory, periodic law, bond theory, inorganic nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, thermodynamics, acid-base reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and radioactivity.. Prerequisites: “C” or above in MATH 1033 OR ACT Math 19 or above OR COMPASS AL 41 or above. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number: CHEM1414

 

CHEM 1124 Chemistry II (II) Chemistry II is an introduction to intermolecular forces, organic chemistry, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, solubility equilibrium and properties of solutions, titration equilibrium, chemical kinetics, acid-base theory and oxidation-reduction. This is an algebra-based course, and is a continuation of CHEM 1113 and CHEM 1111 or CHEM 1114. Prerequisites: C or better in CHEM 1114 and C or better in MATH 1053.  (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  CHEM 1224

 

CISS 0003 Computer Applications This course provides the knowledge and skills required to apply microcomputers in a variety of disciplines. Students will gain hands-on experience in the use of several software packages, including word-processing, spreadsheets, database management, and presentations. Does not count toward a degree. Offered upon demand. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 0033 Keyboarding/Basic Computer Skills (I) This course provides beginning training in the touch operation of the alphabetic and numeric keyboards. Basic computer skills are introduced to provide job skills necessary in many careers with limited computer use. This course is also designed to improve keyboarding and computer skills necessary prior to enrollment in Introduction to Computers.  Does not count toward a business degree or certificate. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 1001 Computer Fundamentals (I,II) This course is designed to introduce students to computer hardware, software, procedures, systems, keyboarding, and applications applied to specific trades. (0,3,1)

 

CISS 1013 Introduction to Computers (I,II,S) A survey of the computer industry with application software lab exercises, including but not limited to history, uses, types, hardware, software, teleprocessing, and networking of computers. Lab exercises introduce the fundamentals of the three most common microcomputer applications:  word processing, electronic spreadsheets, and databases. It is recommended that the student be able to type 25 words per minute. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  CPSI 1003

 

CISS 1123 Computer Software Applications (I, II) This course provides instruction in the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and database application software for microcomputers. Students will become more familiar with computer operations, operating systems and ways of solving everyday problems with software programs. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 1203 Ethics in Technology (I) Introduces technicians to social, legal, and ethical issues in computing and technology.  Students will be introduced to privacy issues, information issues of trust in computers, computer crime, issues on the impact and control of computers, and issues of professional responsibility and ethics. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 1253 Word Processing (I,II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of word processing and is designed to teach students how to enter, edit, format, store, and retrieve documents. Students learn to develop proficiency-level skills in word processing. Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 1353 Electronic Spreadsheet (I,II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of electronic spreadsheets and is designed to teach students how to perform calculations and produce graphs and reports in electronic spreadsheets. Students also learn to analyze information in electronic spreadsheets, and students will learn to develop proficiency-level skills in electronic spreadsheets. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 1503 Introductory Web Design (I) Provides students with real-world experience in designing and implementing web pages. (3, 0, 3)

 

CISS 1703 Desktop Operating Systems (I) Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to address the implementation and desktop support needs of customers who plan to deploy and support Microsoft Windows operating systems. (3, 0, 3)

 

CISS 1804 Computer Maintenance I (I) Designed to prepare students for

entry into the workforce as a computer technician. Students are provided intensive hands-on experience in the theory, operation, troubleshooting and remedial and preventative maintenance of microcomputers as used in the workplace today. This is the first in a series of courses designed to prepare students for diagnosing and repairing modern microcomputers as commonly used in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on preparation for acquiring the A+ certification credential. (3, 3, 4)

 

CISS 1814 Computer Maintenance II (II) A continuation of CISS 1804 – Computer Maintenance I.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in  CISS 1804 (3, 3, 4)

 

CISS 1903 Concepts of Operating Systems (II) Introduction to computer and network  operating systems.  Emphasis on practical application, with discussion and practice on command prompt based systems, graphical user interface systems, and embedded systems. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 2013 Advanced Web Design (II) A continuation of CISS 1503 – Introductory Web Design.  Presents students with an in-depth coverage of HTML, implements design using image editing software, and explains the connection between a detailed design plan that considers audience expectations, sound design principles and various technical considerations that create successful web sites.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in  CISS 1503 Introductory Web Design (3, 0, 3)

 

CISS 2103 Application Programming (II) Provides the students with an understanding of the design and implementation of high level programming languages and a survey of programming language paradigms. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 2203 Fundamentals of UNIX (I)  Designed to give students a fundamental understanding of the Linux operating system. It covers the essentials of installing, configuring, maintaining, administering, and troubleshooting the Linux Operating System. Some topics include Lanning, Installing and Running a Linux System, using Graphical Systems with Linux, The Shell and Text Files, the role of the System Administrator and basic administration tasks of managing system resources.

(3, 0, 3)

 

CISS 2223 Database (I,II) This course covers the theory and logic involved in all aspects of database. Students learn the principles of database and its applications. This course is designed to teach students how to build a database, enter data, query for information, and produce reports. Students also learn the principles of database and its application and will learn to develop proficiency-level skills in database. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Grade “C” or better in CISS 1013. (3,0,3)

 

CISS 2303 Networking Essentials (II)  Provides the students with a fundamental  understanding of networking computers. Some of the topics covered will include network design, networking media, network hardware, network communications, protocols, network administration and network troubleshooting. This course is designed to help students pass the Network+ certification exam offered by CompTia. (3, 0, 3)

 

CISS 2404 Internship (Offered on Demand) Provides students with the opportunity to learn by working and to gain valuable real-world experience. Internship assignments are created with businesses in either a virtual or an actual mode and require eight hours of work per week to fulfill the course requirements. Reporting and supervision requirements developed up beforehand with the student, the intern advisor, and the employer.

 

CNAP 1001 Nursing Assistant I (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant I covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to the foundation of the nursing assistants education and training. This course includes basic instruction in communication, infection, safety, and an introduction to resident care. This course utilizes both theory  instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. Prerequisites: COMPASS scores >65-83 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading. (1,0,1)

 

CNAP 1004 Nursing Assistant II (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant II is a continuation of CNAP 1001. This course covers additional concepts and skills necessary to the nursing assistant curriculum. This course incorporates the addition of clinical practice into the already established theory instruction and skills demonstration given in the classroom and lab. Prerequisites: COMPASS scores >65-83 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading.(2,2,4)

 

CNAP 1101 Nursing Assistant III (Barbara Broyles Alzheimer’s and Dementia Training Program) (offered on demand) Nursing Assistant III covers the specialized skills and understanding necessary when caring for residents with Alzheimer’s and Dementia. This course covers such topics as respect, communication, behavioral issues, nutrition, activities, and burnout. Prerequisites: COMPASS scores >65-83 Reading and ACT >15-19 Reading. (1,0,1)

 

CRJU 1203 Introduction to Criminal Justice (I, II) Introduction to Criminal Justice introduces the history, development and philosophy of the three major components of the criminal justice system:  law enforcement, the courts and the corrections system.  Included is an overview of the United States Criminal Justice system and detailed analysis of the interaction between substantive and procedural law. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  CRJU 1023

 

CRJU 1323 Criminal Investigation (I) A study of the fundamentals of criminal investigation, theory, and history from crime scene to courtroom with an emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crime scenes. (3,0,3)

 

CRJU 1403 Arkansas Criminal Law (II) A study of the criminal statutory provisions in the State of Arkansas. The course includes the interpretation of the statutory criminal law as set forth by the Arkansas Supreme Court and U.S. Supreme Court. (3,0,3)

 

CRJU 2043 Evidence (on demand) A comprehensive study of the rules of evidence. Includes criminal proceedings (trials and hearings), admissibility of evidence, exclusion of illegally seized evidence, burden of proof, hearsay evidence, opinion and expert testimony, admissions, and confessions. (3,0,3)

 

CRJU 2113 Law Enforcement Ethics (on demand) A self-paced examination of the various ethical issues encountered by professionals within the criminal justice system, with an emphasis on law enforcement. Includes the basic philosophies of moral and ethical development and emphasizes police conduct, authority, discretion, and responsibilities. (3,0,3)

 

DIES 1004 Basic Diesel Shop (I Odd and Even Years) A lecture-demonstration course in shop safety and management. The course emphasizes how to use and read service manuals, order parts, perform jobs in the shop, have good rapport with customers, and search for a job. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 1104 Engine Systems (I Odd Years) A course designed to help the student become acquainted with the principles of operation and the components and their functions of internal combustion two-cycle and four-cycle engines. Gasoline, diesel, and LP gas engines are compared. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 1204 Diesel Engines (I Odd Years) An introductory course covering shop tools, special service tools, precision-measuring instruments, shop equipment, and the fundamentals of diesel engine disassembly and assembly. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 1304 Fuel Systems (II Even Years) This course provides an introduction to fuel systems used on medium and heavy-duty diesel engines. Students learn to recognize and identify various components of diesel fuel systems and understand the purpose each component serves. Common problems encountered in servicing diesel fuel systems are also covered. (2,6,4)

DIES 1404 Electrical Systems (II Even Years) A study of the technical fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. This course is designed to give the student a background in and a working knowledge of the principles and functions of charging and starting circuits and electronic controls relating to diesel equipment electrical systems. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 1414 Diesel Electronics (II Even Years) This course covers vehicular computers, instrument gauges, instrument panels, power windows, power door locks, power seats, diesel ignition systems, warning devices, and passive restraint systems. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 2005 Suspension and Steering (I Even Years) This course focuses on frame construction, suspension systems, wheel and tires, basic alignment angles, and alignment procedures of heavy-duty vehicles and steering systems. Common problems and corrections of alignment angles and repair and diagnosis of these systems are also covered. (3,6,5)

 

DIES 2025 Brakes and Hydraulics (II Odd Years) A study of braking systems, design, purposes, and control devices. This course provides instruction in system components and operation and servicing of hydraulic, power-assist, and air brake units. (3,6,5)

 

DIES 2105 Clutches and Power Trains (II Odd Years) A course designed to help the student understand different types of clutch applications and operations along with the understanding

of transmission and drive assemblies.(3,6,5)

 

DIES 2204 Air Conditioning (II Odd Years) A basic course in automotive air conditioning. Lecture and demonstrations cover such topics as troubleshooting, identifying and replacing components, charging, and servicing the air conditioning system. (2,6,4)

 

DIES 2215 Troubleshooting &Inspection (I Even Years) The student will learn to listen to and verify operator’s complaints, and review past maintenance documents to determine needed repairs, and proper procedures for inspecting and repairing the cab and body, tires and wheels, engine compartments, electrical and electronic systems, and chassis and undercarriage. (3,6,5)

 

DRAM 2003 Introduction to Theatre Arts (I) This course is a study of live theatre and how it is produced, how it has developed historically and culturally, and how it is evaluated and analyzed. This is primarily a survey and theory class but it also includes some practical hands on experience in the various theatre crafts as well as theatre going experiences. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  DRAM 1003

 

DRAM 2013 Theatre Practicum (II) Students participate in a live production in which they gain experience in acting as well as work with technical aspects of a production. (3,0,3)

 

ECON 2003 Macroeconomics (I,II,S) A study of macroeconomics analysis including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy growth, and business cycles. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ECON 2103

 

ECON 2103 Microeconomics (I,II,S) A study of microeconomics analysis including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ECON 2203

 

EDCC 1001 Child Care Orientation Training (I,II) This course is designed to provide ten hours of basic orientation training in Early Childhood Education. (1,0,1)

 

EDCC 1003 Foundations of Early Childhood Education (I,II) This course is a study of the principles of child development and learning, and their implication to the teacher in early childhood education programs. The emphasis of this course is on safety, health, and the learning environment. This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical roles of families in their child’s development. The student will become familiar with the theories that early childhood education is based upon and learn how to develop an effective program designed uniquely for children birth to age eight. The student will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1013, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011(3,0,3)

 

EDCC 1013 Child Growth and Development (I,II) This course is a study of the principles of child development and learning, and their implications to the teacher in early childhood programs. The emphasis of this course is on the physical, cognitive, communication, creative, self, social and the guidance aspects of early childhood programs. This course focuses on children birth to age eight and covers all aspects of a child’s physical and cognitive growth and socio-emotional development. The student will be introduced to ways to observe and evaluate children’s development and recognize possible delays in development. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011 (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 1023 Environments For Young Children (I,II) This course is a study of early childhood education as a profession. The emphasis of this course includes strategies to establish family relationships, managing an effective program, and maintaining a commitment to professionalism. This course is designed to provide the student with a broad knowledge base on how to design a program for children developing both typically and atypically. The course provides the opportunity to plan environments that are physically and emotionally secure. The student will plan and implement activities that are age, stage, and culturally appropriate for children birth to age eight. The course content is based upon guidelines established by the Council for Early Childhood Professional Recognition. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1101, MEDL 1011. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 1101 Council Preparation Practicum (I,II) Child Care Practicum is necessary for all CDA students. This course includes directions in completing CDA packet for assessment and preparing the resource file. (1,0,1)

Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1023, MEDL 1011 (1,0,1)

 

EDCC 1203 Child Care Program Administration (Offered on Demand) This course is designed to help the student become a successful administrator of a quality early childhood education program. The course provides information on how to operate both proprietary and non-profit programs. The course helps the student to identify and develop strategies for dealing with management situations, providing quality care as well as training in leadership and organizational skills. Prerequisite: scores of 20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 1213 Child Development (I,II) A course designed to make the student aware of the developmental stages of children. Prerequisite: scores of  20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 1223 Early Childhood Learning Environments (II, Odd Years Only) This course is a study of the elements of a quality early childhood environment. Prerequisite: scores of 20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 2003 History and Foundations of Childcare Education (Offered on Demand) A course designed to cover the basics of early childhood and the principles found in early childhood education. Prerequisite: scores of  20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3)

EDCC 2013 Child Behavior and Guidance (I, Even Years Only) A course designed to make the child care provider aware of behaviors and actions that are found in the child care environment. The course will also cover the principles of guidance of child behaviors. Prerequisite: scores of  20+ English and 58+ Reading on COMPASS exam. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 2023 Advanced Clinical Practicum (I,II) This course is available to meet the needs of students requiring an advisor, on-the-job observation, and review of coursework before applying for the Early Childhood Studies Review given by the Council for Early Childhood Recognition. Additional $25.00 clinical practicum fee is required. Co-requisites: EDCC 1001, 1003, 1013, 1023, 1101, MEDL 1011 (0,9,3)

 

EDCC 2303 Literacy and Language Arts in Early Childhood (II, Even Years Only) This course is designed to make the early childhood educator aware of the acquisition of language and how to provide children birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs with language rich environments by incorporating the four areas of language: speaking, listening, writing and reading. (3,0,3)

 

EDCC 2403 Math and Science for Early Childhood (I, Odd Years Only) Students will become familiar with a variety of ways to introduce children Birth through pre-kindergarten, including children with special needs to ideas and concepts related to math and science. Students will create activities; plan and practice developmentally appropriate experiences that would meet recognized standards (NAEYC, NCTM, etc.) for these areas. (3,0,3)

 

EDGE 1003 College Life Skills (I,II, S) A unique student success course that emphasizes school-to-work skills while at the same time giving strong coverage of academic skills such as note taking, test taking, and time management. This course focuses on practical strategies to help students, both traditional and non-traditional, progress from college to career and enhance self image, through the discussion of topics such as working in groups, making presentations, conducting meetings, listening, and setting goals. (2,1,3)

 

EDUC 2003 Introduction to Education with Field Experience (I,II) An introduction to teaching focusing on the history and philosophy of education. Requires a minimum of 30 hours of observation in Arkansas public schools Students are scheduled to observe at least 5 hours each in elementary, middle school, and secondary settings. (3,2,3)

 

EDUC 2103 K-12 Educational Technology (I) This course will address uses of technology to enhance classroom instruction for current and future teachers, K-12. On completion of the course, students will be able to use computers and application software, integrate computers and educational technology, access information on the World Wide Web, prepare E-portfolios, and develop PowerPoint presentations for classroom instruction (same as CISS 1013) It is recommended that the student be able to type 25 words per minute. (3,0,3)

 

ELEC 1104 Basic Electricity (I) A study of the generation, transmission, theory and use of electricity. Included in this course will be electrical and shop safety, use of power tools, hand tools, and wiring devices used in the electrical trade. (3,3,4)

 

ELEC 1204 Wiring I (I) A study of basic wiring techniques and skills as applied to general house wiring and industrial wiring. A practical application in the laboratory is provided. (2,6,4)

 

ELEC 1303 National Electric Code (I, II) A study of the license requirements and electrical codes as they apply to industrial and construction trades. (3,0,3)

 

ELEC 1403 Industrial Motors & Controls (I, II) The study of electric motor and control systems as applied to the industrial trades. Included are maintenance, installation, wiring diagrams, and trouble-shooting. (2,4,3)

 

ELEC 1603 Wiring II (II) A continued study of commercial and industrial wiring and the study of schematics as applied to the electrical trade. Prerequisite:  ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (1,8,3)

 

ELEC 2314 High Voltage Components and Systems (II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the high voltage components and systems found in modern industrial power plants. Emphasis is on high voltage switches, controls, transformers, and systems found in a modern industrial power plant. . Prerequisite/Co requisites: ELEC 1104, ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (4,0,4)

 

EMPT 1003 First Responder This course is designed to assist the student in acquiring skills and knowledge needed to challenge the Arkansas Fire Academy EMR State examination. This program provides the basic lifesaving knowledge and training required to start a career as an EMR.  The student will learn how to think and act in an emergency situation and how to cope with the rigors and stress presented by these situations. (3,1,3)

 

EMPT 1004 Emergency Medical Technician This course is designed to assist the student in acquiring skills and knowledge needed to challenge the Arkansas State certification and the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technician examination and become a National Registry Emergency Medical Technician. This program provides the basic lifesaving knowledge and training required to start a career as an EMT-B.  The student will learn how to think and act in an emergency situation and how to cope with the rigors and stress presented by these situations. (3,3,4)

 

EMSP 1001 Paramedic Remediation Paramedic Remediation This course is designed to allow the students that have fulfilled the didactic and lab requirements but were unable to successfully challenge the exit exams to complete the course. The intent is to aid the student in preparing for the National Registry Exam. This course will use online test for review and standardized exams will be administered that will allow the student to recognize areas of strength and/or weakness. This course also allows for students to complete any clinical/internship time or skills that they were not able to complete in the regularly schedule program with the protection of malpractice insurance.  (1,0,1)

 

EMSP 1202 Clinical Rotation I This course is a supervised rotation through the clinical settings.  Rotations will include surgery/recovery, lab/IV, respiratory, and emergency room.  This rotation provides students with the opportunity to use advanced level skills in the clinical setting. 140 contact hours. (0,2,2)

 

EMSP 1203 EMS Environment This course reviews the Emergency Medical System with emphasis placed on professionalism, responsibility, community involvement and ethical/legal aspects.  An overview of  body systems will be introduced along with physical assessment. 55 contact hours. (3,1,3)

 

EMSP 1205 Medical Emergencies I This course covers the care of patients with both respiratory and cardiac conditions. It includes normal anatomy and physiology, pathophysiology, assessment, and management of cardiopulmonary conditions. Specialized interventions such as advanced airway and rhythm interpretation with treatment are emphasized. 89 contact hours. (4,2,5)

 

EMSP 1213 Medical Emergencies II This course covers the care of patients with medical emergencies.  It will include diabetic emergencies, anaphylactic reactions, exposure to environmental extremes, alcoholism, poisoning, acute abdomen, genitourinary problems, infectious disease, obstetric/gynecological emergencies, behavioral emergencies, and medical emergencies of the geriatric patient.  53 contact hours. (3,0,3)

 

EMSP 1214 Special Considerations This course covers the care of clients with specialized needs including recognition, management, anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology of pediatric patients.  It will also cover disaster situations, triage, stress management, hazmat, and emergency rescue extrication. 67 contact hours.(4,0,4)

 

EMSP 1215 Anatomy and Pathophysiology This course provides an overview of Anatomy and Physiology with emphasis placed in the Pathophysiology of specific systems where emergency medicine is focused. (5,0,5)

 

EMSP 1216 Traumatic Emergencies This course covers the assessment, management and treatment of traumatic injuries including soft tissue, central nervous system, and musculoskeletal structures. Other injuries involving human systems are also covered. 105 contact hours. (5,1,6)

 

EMSP 1221 Field Internship I This course introduces the student to the internship section of the EMS system.  During this phase the student will function as a team member and be evaluated as such. 50 contact hours. (0,1,1)

 

EMSP 1222 Paramedic Comprehensive Review This course is designed to assist the student in preparing for the National Registry exam. Through instructor led reviews and case studies that revisit key medical and trauma situations the Paramedic may be faced with in the pre-hospital setting. A standardized exam will be administered that will allow the student to identify areas of strength and/or weakness. (2,1,2)

 

EMSP 1223 Clinical Rotation II This course is a supervised rotation through the clinical settings.  As a continuation of Clinical Rotation I, the student will rotate through areas including emergency department, surgery, ICU, OB, Pediatrics, and behavior/psychiatric areas. 160 contact hours. (0,3,3)

 

EMSP 1224 Field Internship II This course is a continuation of Field Internship I.  This course will allow the student to utilize advanced life support interventions. 250 contact hours. (0,4,4)

 

EMSP 1233 Pharmacology This course covers clinical pharmacology, classification and indications of medications.  Precautions, dosages, methods of administration, dosage calculation, and metric conversions are also included. (3,1,3)

 

EMST 1201 Advanced Cardiac Life Support This course is a program of medical intervention used to treat victims of respiratory and or cardiac emergencies and strokes, including invasive techniques such as tracheal intubation and drug administration.  Pre-requisite: current Health Care Provider CPR card and license as an EMT, CRTT, RRT, LPN or RN.  30 contact hours. (1,1,1)

 

ENGL 0033 Literacy This course offers instruction to help students increase vocabulary and comprehension skills as well as develop writing skills, beginning at the paragraph level and progressing to the 5-paragraph essay format. Grammar is addressed within the context of writing.  Students scoring 11 or less on the ACT English test or 19 or below on the COMPASS Writing test must enroll in this course.  Students scoring 18 or less on the ACT Reading test or 82 or less on the COMPASS Reading test may enroll in this course to satisfy the requirement for reading remediation (ENGL0063 Reading). Students must earn a grade of 70% or better to be successful in the course. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree.

 

ENGL 0053 Advanced Writing (I,II,S) This course is a lecture course with an intensive study of the process of writing five paragraph, three point essays. Grammar is addressed within the context of writing. Students scoring 12-18 on the ACT English test or 20-79 on the COMPASS writing test  (or have passed ENGL 0043) must enroll in this course. A grade of 70% or better in the course or a score of 80 or better on the COMPASS is required to pass to ENGL 1013. Students achieving an 80 or higher on the COMPASS pretest will be required to either advance to ENGL 1013 or attend and successfully complete the requirements for ENGL 0053. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree. (3,0,3)

 

ENGL 0063 Reading (I,II,S) This course offers instruction to help students increase vocabulary, comprehension skills, and reading rate. Students scoring 18 or less on the ACT Reading test or 82 or less on the COMPASS Reading test must enroll in this course. A grade of 70% or better or 83 or higher on the COMPASS is required in order to complete the requirements for ENGL 0063. This course does not count toward an Associate’s Degree. (3, 0, 3)

 

ENGL 0073 ALP Writing This course is a workshop that functions in alignment with and support of the paired ENGL 1013 course. ENGL 0073 emphasizes appropriate grammar, punctuation, usage, and mechanics; fundamentals of sentence, paragraph, and essay structure; and reading, study, and compostition strategies. Students scoring 16-18 on the ACT English test or 60-79 on the COMPASS Writing test may enroll in this course. Students must pass ENGL 0073 and ENGL 1013 in order to earn credit for either course. Students must have successfully completed reading remediation or have appropriate reading placement scores (19 or above ACT Reading or 83 or above COMPASS Reading) to enroll in ALP Writing. This course does not count toward an associate’s degree.

 

ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications (I, II) This course is for students to develop reading and writing skills to prepare for occupational demands. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between reading and writing and the ability to become more proficient at both. If a Technical and Industrial student scores at or below ACT 15 in English/Writing or Reading, or at or below Compass 50 in Writing/English or Reading, he or she is required to take ENGL 0083 Occupational Communications. (3,0,3)

 

ENGL 1013 Composition I (I,II,S) Practice in writing clear and effective prose based on accepted conventions of grammar, usage, diction, and logic, and a study of the techniques of using the library in preparation of documented papers. Emphasis on the interrelationship between reading and writing skills and practice in writing standard essay patterns. Prerequisite:  A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 0053 and ENGL 0063; or ACT 19 (Reading and English) or COMPASS 83 (Reading) and 80 (Writing). (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ENGL 1013

 

ENGL 1023 Composition II (I,II,S) A continuation of ENGL 1013 with greater maturity in writing and skill in reading expected; reading of literature to include study of basic literary terms and techniques; reading of non-fiction such as editorials and critical essays; writing of critical papers; writing of a major research paper. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1013. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ENGL 1023

 

ENGL 2003 Creative Writing Creative Writing is a combination lecture/workshop course designed to teach the basics of creating poetry, short fiction, drama, and creative nonfiction. Prerequisite ENGL 1013. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ENGL 2013

ENGL 2023 World Literature I (I,II,S) World Literature I is a survey course of literary classics in the global tradition. The course offers selections from masterpieces beginning with The Epic of Gilgamesh and Greek and Roman writers followed by selections from the Middle Ages. The course continues with poetry and drama from the Renaissance.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1023. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2113

 

ENGL 2123 World Literature II (I,II,S) World Literature II is a survey course of literary classics in the global tradition. The course offers selections from masterpieces beginning with Neoclassicism and continuing to the Modern Period.  Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1023. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number: ENGL 2123

 

ENGL 2203 American Literature I (I) A survey covering significant writers and works from the colonial period through the Civil War, including such authors as Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Whitman, and Dickinson. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ENGL 2653

 

ENGL 2253 Technical Writing (I,II) This course is designed to help students learn the foundations and conventions of technical writing in its various forms and contexts. Research and writing will be the main part of the curriculum with focus on how to produce written communication that informs, persuades and records information. Study will include professional writing which demonstrates clarity of style and an understanding of the purposes for which these reports, letters, articles and other forms are used in settings such as American law, medicine and business.

Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1013. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ENGL 2023

 

FSED 1001 Funeral Service Orientation (I) This is a study of funeral service ethics to include telephone techniques, first call, vital statistics and professional relationships and funeral service forms including Veteran’s and Social Security benefits. (1,0,1)

 

FSED 1002 History of Funeral Service (I) This course is a study of the history of funeral service as well as the progression of associations and education within funeral service. (2,0,2)

 

FSED 1003 Funeral Service Chemistry (II) Funeral Service Chemistry is a course designed specifically to meet the requirements for students in the funeral service program.  This is a survey course that includes inorganic, organic and biochemistry components.  Other topics that are included are specific to funeral services, including specific safety issues. Prerequisites:  MATH1033 recommended (3,0,3)

 

FSED 1004 Embalming I (I) A basic course in embalming including the physical and chemical changes which occur in the body, both prior to and after death. Also covered in this course are the signs and tests for death along with embalming terminology, an in-depth look at the preparation room, including instruments, their proper names and uses, and calculations of solution strengths. A study is also devoted to anatomical and linear guides as they are related from an embalming standpoint. A practicum is included for the student to assist with the embalming and preparation of ten (10) human bodies at a clinical site approved by the College. (3,2,4)

 

FSED 1012 Restorative Art I (I) This course teaches a student the basic fundamentals of restorative art. It includes such areas as bones of the head and their respective landmarks, facial markings, muscles, and tissue thickness. Facial proportions, profile shapes, and head shapes are also discussed. This course emphasizes the use of proper terminology as well as terms of position and direction. This course also involves a study of the methods of attachment and support for the ear and nose, as well as problem cases with the mouth and eyes. (2,1,2)

 

FSED 1022 Restorative Art II (II) This course covers restorative art waxes, color theory, and the importance of color in the funeral service profession. The study of cosmetics and their application for viewing in the funeral setting is also discussed. This course also includes a special laboratory in anatomical wax modeling, and also emphasizes the use of proper terminology. (2,1,2)

 

FSED 1013 Funeral Service Anatomy (I) This course involves the study of the human body with particular emphasis on those systems providing the foundation for embalming, pathology, public health and restorative art.  Funeral Service Anatomy is designed to meet the requirements of the funeral service program.  This is a one-semester, non-lab course that does not meet the science requirements for any degree other than funeral service.  (3, 0, 3)

 

FSED 1033 Funeral Directing (I) This course is a study of the total funeral service environment including the duties, responsibilities, skills, and ethical obligations and procedures used by licenses funeral directors. A practicum is included for the student to assist in the day-to-day activities of a licensed funeral director. Each student will be required to turn in 10 funeral activity forms. (3,0,3)

 

FSED 1204 Embalming II (II) This course involves an in-depth study on the principles and techniques of embalming. Includes a study of the embalming chemicals used to treat deceased bodies, methods of injection and drainage, and the proper embalming procedures for handling special cases. A practicum is included for the student to assist with the embalming and preparation of ten (10) human bodies at a clinical site approved by the College. (3,2,4)

 

FSED 1313 Funeral Service Merchandising and Management (II) This is a course that is designed to introduce the funeral service student to the basics of merchandising as they apply to the funeral profession and the basic principles of funeral service management.  This course will cover construction and features of caskets, outer burial containers, and other funeral related products.  It will also examine methods of purchasing, pricing, display, and sale of funeral merchandise as well as funeral services.  This course stresses general management technique and theory and specific areas of funeral service management guidelines for those areas.  (3, 0, 3)

 

FSED 2103 Funeral Psychology/ Sociology (I) A study of the normal symptoms of grief in adults and children and the funeral director’s role in grief counseling in conjunction with the psychological and sociological aspect of human emotions, religious customs, and cultures as they pertain to the funeral, death, and final disposition. (3,0,3)

 

FSED 2203 Comprehensive Review (II) A general review of the entire curriculum for graduating sophomores, culminating with an exam designed to prepare students for the National Board and various state board examinations. To be taken in student’s final semester. (3,0,3)

 

FSED 2213 Microbiology/ Pathology (II) This course is a study of basic microbiology pathology principles as applied to mortuary science. It includes the basic need for an understanding of the causes of diseases and those diseases which have some effect upon the embalmer. (3,0,3) 

 

FSED 2223 Business and Funeral Law (I) This is a lecture course in the study of the basic principles of business law and legal and ethical aspects as related to funeral service. Especially stressed are the bodies of law and the judicial system found in the United State of America including contracts, sales, bailments (including carriers), commercial paper, agency, employment, and business organization.   It is designed to introduce the student to sources of law, the legal status of the dead human body, the duty of burial, the right to control funeral arrangements and final disposition, liability for funeral expenses, torts involving the dead human body and the funeral director, wills, estates and probate proceedings, cemeteries and issues related thereto, state and federal laws and regulations pertaining to funeral service, and the legal aspects of being a licensed funeral director/mortician.  This course will familiarize the student with the Federal Trade Commission and the Trade Regulation Rule on Funeral Industry Practice. (3,0,3)

 

GEOG 2203 Introduction to Geography (II,S) A description of the present pattern of mankind in relation to certain physical and cultural elements of the total environment. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  GEOG 1103

 

GEOL 1004 Physical Geology (II) Physical Geology is the study of the internal and external processes that are active in and on the earth.  Topics include, but are not limited to, magnetism, minerals, rocks, landforms, plate tectonics, and geological processes.  Lab is required. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  GEOL 1114

 

GTAS 1112 General Tool and Safety (I,II) This course is an introduction to the basic principles, types, intended purposes, and  the safe usage of hand tools and power tools, OSHA laws and regulations,  and the principles of good customer service. (1,3,2)

 

HIST 1023 Arkansas History (I,II,S) A history of Arkansas’ social, political and economic development from the first Europeans to the present. (3,0,3)

 

HIST 1113 World Civilizations I (I,II,S) A survey of ancient and medieval history, with emphasis on Asian, African and European cultures.. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  HIST 1223

 

HIST 1123 World Civilizations II (I,II,S) A survey of global history, from the early modern period until present day. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  HIST 1213

 

HIST 2013 U.S. History I (I,II,S) A general survey of the history of the United States from the beginning of North American colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  HIST 2113

 

HIST 2023 U.S. History II (I,II,S) A general survey of the history of the United States from the end of the American Reconstruction to the present. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  HIST 2123

 

HUMN 280X Special Topics in Humanities Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

HUMN 290X Internship This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, overisght by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern site’s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4)

 

HVAC 1002 Tubing and Piping (I) A study of the process of identifying tubing and piping with practical applications in sizing and fitting to different configurations using mechanical fittings. (1,2,2)

 

HVAC 1204 Principles of Refrigeration (I) A comprehensive study of mechanical refrigeration systems emphasizing proper service techniques through analysis of the problem. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are covered in depth. (2,7,4)

 

HVAC 1503 Motors and Controls (II) A study of the theory and operation of electric motors and their controls. Principles of sizing, trouble-shooting, and repairing will be covered. (2,4,3)

 

HVAC 1604 Schematics (II) A study of the schematic wiring diagrams found in the air conditioning and refrigeration industry. Interpretation, reading, drawing, and troubleshooting techniques utilizing schematic wiring diagrams are included. (3,3,4)

 

HVAC 1703 Air Properties (I) A study of air properties and the instrumentation to meet the needs of a residential or commercial structure and the factors involved in the calculation of heating and cooling loads. (2,4,3)

 

HVAC 1804 Residential Systems (I) A study of the major components and control devices and their applications. The student will troubleshoot and repair existing systems. (2,7,4)

 

HVAC 1904 Air Conditioning Systems (II) A study of A/C systems and the practical applications and installation of combustion heat, electrical heat, cooling system, and heat pumps. Included is the study of air properties and instrumentation to meet the needs of a residential structure and the factors involved in the calculations of heating and cooling loads. (2,7,4)

 

INMT 1104 Hydraulics/ Pneumatics (I,II) A study of physical laws, design, selection, and trouble-shooting of hydraulic and pneumatic equipment. (4,2,4)

 

INMT 1003 Blueprint Reading (I,II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of reading and interpreting basic drawings. (3,0,3)

 

INMT 1304 Basic Programmable Controllers (II) A study of programmable controllers (PC’s); the PC is a microprocessor-based, programmable device that replaces on/off control devices such as relays and switches in discrete control systems. Prerequisites: ELEC 1104, ELEC 1403. (3,3,4)

 

INMT 1404 Mechanical Devices & Systems (I,II) This course provides the study and applications related to the maintenance and repair of equipment and machines found in a wide range of industrial operations. (3,3,4)

 

INMT 2415 Instrumentation and Controls (I,II) This course is designed to advance the students knowledge and skill in installing, maintaining, troubleshooting, repairing, and replacing the instruments and data systems encountered in a modern industrial power plant. Prerequisite/Co requisite: ELEC 1104, ELEC 1204, ELEC 1403 (5,0,5)

 

MACH 1003 Introduction to Machining Processes (I) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the care and operation of basic metalworking machine tools, precision measuring instruments and shop safety.  (2,3,3)

 

MACH 1203 Machine Shop I-A This is an abbreviated machine shop course that gives the student a basic knowledge of safety, layout, use of precision measuring instruments, and operation of machine shop equipment. This course is ordinarily taught at night and in combination with MACH 1212. Together, the courses present the information in MACH 1205. (2,4,3)

 

MACH 1205 Machine Shop I (I) This course gives the student the basic knowledge and actual operation of machine shop equipment. Included are safety, layout, and use of precision measuring instruments. (3,8,5)

 

MACH 1212 Machine Shop I-B This course is a continuation of MACH 1203. Prerequisite: MACH 1203. (1,4,2)

 

MACH 1215 Basic Lathe Operations (I) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the use and operation of a metalworking lathe. Tapers, knurling, threading, and form turning operations are taught as well as accuracy and speed. Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003(3,8,5)

 

MACH 1305 Machine Shop II (I,II) Continuation of MACH 1205. Prerequisite:  MACH 1205 or MACH 1203 and MACH 1212 (2,9,5)

 

MACH 1315 Basic Knee Mill Operations (II) This course allows the student to develop the basic knowledge and skill in the use and operation of the milling machine and the indexing, turntable, and broaching head attachments. It also covers straight, form, tapering and boring attachments.  Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003 (2,9,5)

 

MACH 1403 Introduction to CNC Processes (II) This course allows the student to develop an understanding of Computer Numerical Control (CNC); what it is, how it came about, and how it is used in industry today. Students will be introduced to Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) and the production of codes used to control 3D printers and CNC Lathes and Mills (CAM). Pre-requisite/Co-requisite MACH 1003 and INMT 1003 (2,3,3)

 

MATH 0043 Introductory Algebra (I, II, S) A developmental math course which focuses on basic mathematical concepts and the beginning concepts of algebra. A study of whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, order of operations, writing and solving linear equations, percents, US and Metric conversions, number line graphing, and coordinate plane graphing. Students’ must earn a minimum grade of “C” in order to enroll in an advanced course. Does NOT count toward a degree. Students will participate in lab one hour per week. No prerequisite. (3,1,3)

 

MATH 0063 AAS Math Remediation (I, II) A developmental math course designed specifically for students in pursuit of an Associate of Applied Science degree who have a placement score of Math ACT 15 or below; Compass AL 20 or below. A study of basic math concepts. Does NOT count toward a degree. Students will participate in lab one hour per week. Any student enrolling in this course must have one of the following declared majors: AAS Business Administration, AAS Funeral Services Education, AAS Medical Office Management, AAS Early Childhood Education, AAS Paramedic, AGS Practical Nursing focus, TC Business Technology, TC Practical Nursing, TC Health Care or AAS, TC, and CP Supply Chain Management. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 1033 Intermediate Algebra (I, II, S) A developmental math course designed for students who are not sufficiently proficient in algebraic skills to take MATH 1053 College Algebra or MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy. A study of real numbers, order of operations, linear equations and inequalities, absolute value equations and inequalities, coordinate plane graphing, functions, exponent rules, scientific notation, factoring, rational expressions, and radicals. Student’s must earn a minimum grade of “C” in order to enroll in an advanced course. Does NOT count toward a degree. Prerequisite:  Math ACT 17-18; Compass AL 26-40; Compass PA 41 or above; or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 1043 Plane Trigonometry (II) A study of right and oblique triangles; angular magnitude, velocity and acceleration, variation of trigonometric functions, and formulae relating to the functions and identities. Prerequisite:  MATH 1053 College Algebra with a C or better (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 1203

 

MATH 1053 College Algebra (I,II,S) A study in algebraic processes in inequalities and equations of quadratic and higher degree, progressions,  determinants, matrices, and binomial theorem. Prerequisite:  A “C” or better in MATH 1033 or ACT score of 19 on the mathematics section or COMPASS score of 41 or above on the Algebra test (AL). (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 1103

 

MATH 1063 AAS Math Business (I, II) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in Funeral Services Education, Business Administration, Medical Office Management, Early Childhood Education, TC in Accounting, and TC in Business Technology. Business applications include, but are not limited to: calculation of markup/markdown rates, payroll deductions; property, income, and unemployment taxes; insurance premiums; and interest and finance charges on consumer loans. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Compass AL 21 or pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better; or pass MATH 0063 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 1073 AAS Math T&I (I, II) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in General Technology.  Technical applications include, but are not limited to: Interpretation of charts and graphs, using formulas to solve for RPM, acceleration, electrical circuit values, apparent and true power, and efficiency. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Compass AL 21 or  pass MATH 0043 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 1083 AAS Math Health Professions (I, II) A math course designed to deliver degree specific mathematical concepts to students seeking an Associate of Applied Science in Respiratory Care or Paramedic, an Associate of General Studies with a Practical Nursing focus, or a Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing or Health Professions.  Health professions applications include, but are not limited to: measurement and conversion between household, metric and apothecary measurements, interpretation of basic statistics and graphs, and dosage calculations. Prerequisite: Math ACT 16; Compass PA 21; passed MATH 0043 with a “C” or better; passed MATH 0063 with a “C” or better. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 1153 Quantitative Literacy (II). A mathematics course in which students will solve problems using mathematical reasoning involving logic, proportions, algebra, and relations. Instruction will focus on process, conceptual understanding, communication and problem solving found in the following strands: (a) Personal, state, and national finance, (b) Statistics, (c) Probability, and (d) Functions and Mathematical modeling including contextual linear models and exponential growth and decay models. Prerequisites: A “C” or better in MATH 1033; Math ACT 19; or Compass AL 41. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number: MATH 1113

 

MATH 1175 Pre-Calculus Provides the necessary background for students planning to take Calculus I or Compact Calculus. Topics include: problem solving; polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; parametric equations; and as time permits, linear systems. (5,0,5)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 1305

 

MATH 2003 Elementary Statistics (I,II) An introductory course in statistical methods. Collection and display of data, mean, standard deviation and variance, probability including the normal, binomial, and chi-square distributions. Also sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing including non-parametric tests, regression, and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 1053. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 2103

 

MATH 2013 Math for Teachers I (I)  This course is for prospective P-8 education majors. Topics include a study of sets, numeration systems, the structure of arithmetic, number theory, and, beginning concepts of rational numbers, all with an emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: Placement scores equivalent to College Algebra (41 COMPASS or 19 ACT) to enroll in Math for Teachers 1. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 2015 Calculus I The first of a course sequence covering calculus. Topics in the calculus sequence will include analytical geometry, functions, limits, derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinate, transcendental functions, particle derivatives, multiple integrals, sequences and series, the generalized mean value theorem, and improper integrals. (5,0,5)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 2405

 

MATH 2023 Math for Teachers II (II) This course is a continuation of MATH 2013. Topics include a study of probability, geometry, measurement, and data analysis, all learned within a problem solving framework. Prerequisite: A “C” or above in MATH 1053 and a “C” or above in MATH 2013. (3,0,3)

 

MATH 2025 Calculus II The second course sequence covering calculus. The topics in the calculus sequence will include analytical geometry, functions, limits derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, parametric equations, polar coordinate, transcendental functions, particle derivatives, multiple integrals, sequences and series, the generalized mean value theorem, and improper integrals. (5,0,5)

ACTS Index Number:  MATH 2505

 

MATH 280X Special Topics in Math Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

MEDL 1001 HCP CPR & First Aid Instruction is given in Healthcare Provider CPR Adult/Child and First Aid. Students receive certification through the American Heart Association. There will be a fee of $10.00 assessed for CPR and First Aid Certification card. 16 contact hours. (1,0,1)

 

MEDL 1003 Introduction to Health Care Systems (I) Examines the administration and structure of health care delivery in the United States.  The course also provides information regarding the health care system development and discusses organizational patterns, facilities, health care personnel, and the economic, political, and environmental influences that affect the health care system. (3,0,3)

 

MEDL 1021 Adult CPR & First Aid Instruction is given in Adult Heartsaver CPR and Adult First Aid for lay rescuers, particularly those who are expected to respond to emergencies in the workplace. Students receive certification through the American Heart Association. There will be a fee of $10.00 assessed for CPR and First Aid Certification card. 12 contact hours. (1,0,1)

 

MEDL 1011 Pediatric HCP CPR & First Aid This course is designed to teach the skills of CPR, relief of choking for infants and children, the prevention of injuries and cardiac arrest, and basic pediatric first aid to all lay rescuers, particularly those who are expected to respond to emergencies in the workplace. Students receive certification through the American heart Association. There will be a fee of $5 for each certification card. (1,0,1)

 

MEDL 1333 Phlebotomy Theory with Practicum Phlebotomy Theory and Practicum covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to the foundation of the phlebotomy technician education and training. This course includes basic instruction in quality assurance, patient confidence, infection control, safety, anatomy, an introduction to skillful drawing of blood specimens, and specimen processing techniques. This course utilizes both theory instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. (2,3,3)

 

MEDL 2003 Legal Concepts of Health Care (II) Provides an overview of the principles of law as applied to health care.  The course gives consideration to the importance of medical records as legal documents, to the legal aspects of health care organizations, to the release of information, and to consents and authorizations. (3,0,3)

 

MEDL 2033 Red Cross CPR and First Aid (II) This is a course in basic American Red Cross First Aid and American Red Cross Community CPR. (2,1,3)

 

MEDL 2103 (OFAD 1313) Medical Terminology (I,II) The student is introduced to terminology that is specific to the health care industry. The student becomes familiar with terms used in nursing, respiratory care, and other health care professions. (3,0,3)

 

MEDL 280X Special Topics in Medical Professions Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

Applied Music (I,II) Applied Music courses (private instruction) receive elective credit only on the A.A. degree programs. Course numbers ending in “1” are for one 30-minute lesson per week and receive one credit hour. Course numbers ending in “2” are for one hour lesson per week and receive two credit hours. Successive courses in any discipline are sequential, but each emphasizes fundamental technique, music literature, musical style, and interpretation. A non-refundable applied music fee (does not apply to ensembles) of $50 per credit hour is charged in addition to the normal registration fees.

 

Voice – MUSI 1212, 1222, 2212, 2222

Piano – MUSI 1231, 1241, 2231, 2241

Guitar – MUSI 1252, 1262, 2252, 2262

 

Ensembles  UA HOPE-TEXARKANA offers several opportunities for students to participate in performing ensembles. The ensembles are for one hour of elective credit only. In addition to rehearsals, members of an ensemble are expected to participate in a limited number of public performances for various campus and community events.

 

MUSI 1111, 1121, 1131, 1141 – UA HOPE-TEXARKANA Choir A student and community based choir for any interested singer. Rehearsal time will be determined when course is offered. (1,0,1)

 

MUSI 2103 Music Appreciation (I, II, S) Music Appreciation is a survey course designed to encourage a higher degree of understanding and enjoyment of classical music.  Students will experience music through a variety of activities including listening, discussion, analysis, and live performance.  This course follows the historical development of music with emphasis on 17th, 18th, and 19th century styles and composers. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number: MUSC1003

 

NURS 1001 Medication Calculations (S) This course instructs the student regarding an understanding of basic mathematics, measurement equivalencies, and their application to dosage calculation using dimensional analysis. This course will be required of all Practical Nursing students scoring at or below 80% on the course pretest. (1,0,1)

 

NURS 1002 Pharmacology I (I) This course is a study of medication, calculation, and administration. Topics of study include usual dosages, expected actions, side effect, and contraindications. Students must pass a calculations examination to progress further into the program. (2,0,2)

 

NURS 1004 Clinical Practicum (I) This course provides supervised clinical experience of students in a healthcare setting. Students perform fundamental skills and demonstrate knowledge in the care of Geriatric client. (0,11,4)

 

NURS 1012 Gerontological Nursing (I) Gerontological Nursing is a study of the special needs of the geriatric client. It includes management skill in long term care and delegation as it pertains to the practical nurse. (2,0,2)

 

NURS 1021 Venous Access and Therapy Venous Access and Therapy covers the basic fundamental concepts essential to accessing the venous system for obtaining blood or administering intravenous fluids and medications. This course includes basic instruction in quality assurance, patient confidence, infection control, safety, anatomy, an introduction to skillful drawing of blood specimens, and specimen processing techniques. This course utilizes both theory instruction and skills demonstration in the classroom and lab. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. Corequisite:  NURS 1105 Nursing Concepts II. (1,1,1)

 

NURS 1022 Maternal/Infant Nursing (I) This course is a study of nursing care during the prenatal, labor, delivery, postnatal, and neonatal periods. Normal and abnormal conditions are discussed.  (2,0,2)

 

NURS 1103 Nursing Concepts I (S) Nursing Concepts I is a course that introduces the theory and skill required of the entry-level practical nurse. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. (3,1,3)

 

NURS 1105 Nursing Concepts II (I) Nursing Concepts II is a course that builds on NURS 1103, completing the theory and skill required of the entry-level practical nurse. Concepts and theory associated with the understanding and development of these skills are presented, with emphasis on use of nursing process. Laboratory practice of skill and technique is incorporated throughout the course. (5,1,5)

 

NURS 2002 Pharmacology II (II) This course integrates commonly used medications with specific medical surgical diseases and disorders. (2,0,2)

 

NURS 2008 Nursing of Adults (II) This course is a study of the common medical surgical disorders of the adult. It includes signs and symptoms, treatment, nursing care, and outcomes.  (8,0,8)

 

NURS 2012 Pediatric Nursing (II) This course is a study of the basic principles of growth and development, hospitalization, and care and treatment of common childhood illnesses. (2,0,2)

 

NURS 2019 Clinical Practicum II (II) This course provides supervised, preceptor, and observational experiences in a variety of clinical settings.  Students rotate through medical surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and mental health areas.  Theory content is taught concurrently or prior to the students’ specific clinical experience.  Prerequisites: NURS 1103 (0, 34, 9)

 

NURS 2021 Mental Health Nursing (I) Mental Health is a lecture course required to assist the practical nursing student develop a basic understanding of mental health and mental illness.  It introduces the basic concepts of mental health and the most common conditions of mental illness including nursing care and treatment.  Alcoholism and drug abuse is also introduced. (1,0,1)

 

NURS 28XX Special Topics X This is a course developed for students who have previous professional experience and/or theory content and through program and/or standardized testing demonstrate a standard of knowledge acceptable to meet selected course objectives. This course modifies designated practical nursing courses in order to fulfill the needed knowledge base for such students with previous experience and/or theory content. This course is used to replace NURS coursework during a specified semester.

 

PHED XXX1 Activity (I,II) Instruction and practice in sports and activities which contribute to present and future recreational needs, organic development, and fitness of the student. Instruction is in the roles, strategies, social behavior, and techniques of individual and dual team sports and physical fitness activities. All activity courses involve two one-hour laboratories weekly. (0,2,1)

 

PHED 1031 Physical Fitness I (I, II) Physical fitness I is a strength training and cardiovascular training class. It is designed for students to gain knowledge of rep-out, pyramid, and circuit training programs. (0,2,1)

 

PHED 1041 Physical Fitness II (I, II) Physical fitness II is a strength training class. It is designed to teach students the different exercises that target each muscle group. They will be required to learn exercises and the muscle groups. (0,2,1)

 

PHED 1061 Cardio Walking This course is designed for the beginning or intermediate walker. It will deal with improving fitness by increasing general physical strength, agility, muscular performance, endurance, and cardiovascular fitness. The bulk of the course will consist of active participation and class lectures. (0,2,1)

 

PHED 1213 Personal and Community Health (I,II) A consideration of the various conditions and factors affecting individual and community health. Designed to assist students in formulating their philosophies, attitudes, and understanding of behaviors necessary to establish healthful living practices. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  HEAL 1003

 

PHIL 2003 (PHIL 1301) Introduction to Philosophy (I,II) This is a survey course of some of the major thinkers in philosophy beginning with the Asian sages and the Pre-Socratics followed by Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Selections from the Middle Ages include Thomas Aquinas. The course concludes with Descartes, Hume, Mills and Marx. The course will incorporate moral philosophy and modern ethics throughout with major attention to human values, the nature of reality and knowledge, and critical thinking. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  PHIL 1103

 

PHIL 2203 World Religions (I) A survey course offering students increased cultural awareness and global understanding. Beginning with definitions and common features of religions, the course introduces the student to Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. (3,0,3)

 

PHSC 1024 Physical Science (I,II) The course will provide a survey of physics, chemistry, and the earth sciences with laboratory exercise to complement each of the individual topics as they are studied. (3,3,4)

ACTS Index Number:  PHSC 1004

 

PLSC 2103 American Government (I,II,S) American Government is an introduction to the history, development and philosophy of American government and politics, including an overview of the three branches of the United States government and a study of the American Constitution. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  PLSC 2003

 

PLSC 2203 Comparative Government Comparative Government is a study of several of the world’s governments as compared to the United States government, including historical background, key institutions and political attitudes. (3,0,3)

 

PSYC 2303 General Psychology (I,II,S) Introduction of fundamental concepts and basic content of psychology. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  PSYC 1103

 

PSYC 2313 Developmental Psychology (I,II,S) A comprehensive survey of human growth, maturation, and development over the whole life span. Prerequisite:  PSYC 2303. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  PSYC 2103

 

PWRM 1313 Troubleshooting and Repair (I) This is the first in a series of two courses designed to introduce the student to the methods and techniques of maintaining a modern industrial power plant. The intent of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge and skills needed to install new parts or systems, maintain existing equipment and systems troubleshoot various malfunctions throughout the plant, and repair or replace the various parts or systems as needed.  PRE-REQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: INMT 1404 and INMT 1104 (3,0,3)

 

PWRM 1325 Couplings and Seals (II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the techniques and processes associated with the installation, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repair of the components and systems that make up a modern day industrial plant. PRE-REQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: INMT 1404, INMT 1104, and PWRM 1313 (5,0,5)

 

PWRO 1213 Introduction to Power Plant Operations (I) This is the first course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the operators responsibilities in the operation of the plant. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, and PWRT 1023 (3,0,3)

 

PWRO 1223 Concepts of Process Control (I) This is the third course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the basic components and systems used to control the steam/water cycle of plant operations. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, and PWRO 1223 (3,0,3)

 

PWRO 1233 Concepts and Practices of Coal Handling (I) This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts, practices, and processes involved in receiving, storing, and preparing coal for use in a modern day coal fired electrical power generation facilities. Emphasis is placed on operator responsibilities and safety.. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, and PWRO 1213 (3,0,3)

 

PWRO 1244 Electricity Generation Components and Controls (I) This is the fourth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the components and systems required for the consistent, efficient, and safe generation of electrical power. PRE-REQUISITE/CO-REQUISITE: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223 and PWRO 1233

 (4,0,4)

 

PWRO 1253 Thermodynamics (II) This is the fifth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. This course will focus on the science of thermodynamics and efficiency as it relates to modern steam boilers. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, and PWRO 1244 (3,0,3)

 

PWRO 1264 Heat Rate Improvement (II) This is the sixth course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the concept of heat rate as it pertains to boiler operation, the components involved in producing, controlling, and conveying the heat energy needed to generate steam, and the methods employed to increase and maintain the efficiency of that process. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, PWRO 1244, and PWRO 1253 (4,0,4)

 

PWRO 1273 Boiler Operations and Water Chemistry (II) This is the seventh course in a series of seven designed to prepare the student to work in the operations area of an industrial power plant by providing the basic foundation of knowledge concerning the operation of electrical power plants. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the National and State codes associated with boiler operation, the theory and application of water chemistry required to maintain effective boiler operations, the various methods of water purification associated with power plants, and the handling and treatment of waste water produced by the generation of power. PRE-REQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: PWRT 1003, PWRT 1013, PWRT 1023, PWRO 1213, PWRO 1223, PWRO 1233, PWRO 1244, PWRO 1253, and PWRO 1264 (3,0,3)

 

PWRT 1003 Fundamentals of Modern Power Plants (I) This course is designed to introduce the student to the major systems, components and theories of operation of modern day electrical power generation technology and facilities. Emphasis is placed on steam/water cycle. (3,0,3)

 

PWRT 1013 Basic Steam Generation (II) This is the second in the introductory series of courses that provide the student with a broad overview of the components and systems of a modern power plant and how they operate. The purpose of this course is to expand the student’s basic foundation of knowledge concerning basic steam generation and associated equipment. Prerequisite: PWRT 1003 (3,0,3)

 

PWRT 1023 Power Plant Components and Systems (II) This course is designed to introduce the student to the major systems, components, and theories of operation of modern day electrical power generation technology and facilities. Emphasis is placed on instrumentation, piping, and valving. (3,0,3) Pre-requisites/Co-requisites: PWRT 1003 and PWRT 1013 (3,0,3)

 

RNSG 2119:  Nursing Process I (II) This course provides the foundational theory for LPNs/LPTNs to transition to the responsibilities and roles of RNs. The student is introduced to ARNEC’s goals, philosophy, and learning objectives.  These objectives will build on the concepts of holism, human need, nursing process, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span. The student’s fundamental knowledge base will evolve by introducing knowledge, assessment and clinical skills, behaviors, and critical thinking skills that are required to function in the role as a Registered Nurse.  This course also explores the legal, ethical, and social issues related to the Registered Nursing role. Basic pharmacology and fundamental nursing theory, skills, and medical math will be reviewed to prepare students for subsequent semesters.

This course also provides lecture content for the age group involving the newborn through adolescence (pediatrics). The student will be provided a longitudinal view of the child as an individual on a continuum of developmental changes and as a member of a family unit. There will be discussion of social, cultural, and religious influences on child development and health promotion. Students will receive instruction on pediatric assessment, including interviewing skills, physical and behavioral observations, developmental levels, and preventive health care guidelines. Instruction will also include care of the child with cognitive and sensory impairment, chronic illness, serious body system diseases, and pain. Care of the hospitalized child, including pediatric clinical procedures, and home care guidelines are incorporated into the content. Prerequisite:  Admission to the ARNEC program. Co-requisite: RNSG 2123. (9, 0, 9)

 

RNSG 2123:  Nursing Practicum I (II) This clinical lab course enables the student to practice the knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are acquired in RNSG 2119.  Students will have opportunity to learn new clinical skills along with sharpening previously learned skills. Practicum hours will include general clinical skills, medication administration, pediatric client care, and medical/surgical client care. Students are introduced to the role of the Registered Nurse by applying new skills in the assessment, planning, intervention, and evaluation of their clients. Curriculum concepts and comprehension are carried out per clinical application. Prerequisite:  Admission to the ARNEC program. Co-requisites: RNSG 2119. (0 , 9, 3)

 

RNSG 2216: Nursing Process II (S) This first part of this course utilizes an integrated approach to further emphasize the skills, knowledge, and behaviors needed to care for clients in the areas of the child-bearing family, newborn, and women’s health. Topics will include normal and high-risk client care in the areas of the prenatal period, labor and delivery, postpartum, and the newborn period. The emerging field of genetics, major genetic diseases, and the role nurses play is also incorporated. Lecture content also includes human reproduction, reproductive health, family planning, female cancers, and general women’s health care. The second part of this course provides principles and concepts of mental health, psychopathology, and treatment modalities related to the nursing care of clients and their families. The focus of this course is on the psychosocial impact of wellness-illness problems of the adolescent, adult, and geriatric populations and the management and adaptation process. The course objectives will incorporate holism, human needs, growth and development, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span for clients in these areas. Prerequisite:  RNSG 2119, RNSG 2123. Co-requisite: RNSG 2223. (6, 0, 6)

 

RNSG 2223:  Nursing Practicum II (S) This clinical experience allows the student to synthesize new knowledge, apply previous knowledge, and gain experience in care of the child-bearing family, newborn, and women’s health. Students also use their skills in assessing and caring for children and adults with genetic abnormalities. This course also provides students with the opportunity to provide nursing care to adolescent, adult, and geriatric clients with mental illness. Students will observe and participate in treatment modalities for common mental illnesses, including therapeutic communication and safety planning. Students will engage in the clinical application of concepts covered in RNSG 2216, demonstrating progressive mastery and independence in Registered Nursing practice.  Prerequisite:  RNSG 2119, RNSG 2123. Co-requisite: RNSG 2216. (0, 9, 3)

 

RNSG 2318: Nursing Process III (I) This course builds upon the previous instruction and incorporates higher level nursing care, critical thinking, and clinical decision making. Management and leadership are strongly incorporated throughout this course. The student will learn to function in higher level situations by utilizing the nursing process as a framework for caring for clients with complex healthcare needs related to all body systems. The student will learn basic care methodology for clients in emergency (including bioterrorism preparedness), critical care, surgical care, and acute care and long-term care settings. Advanced pharmacological concepts are also integrated into this course. Concepts of holism, human needs, growth and development, communications, safety, and wellness-illness across the life span are incorporated. Prerequisites:  RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2311, RNSG 2323. (8, 0, 8)

 

RNSG 2323:  Nursing Practicum III (I) This clinical experience continues to build upon previous instruction and allows the student to deliver higher level nursing care, perform higher level clinical decision making, and demonstrate management and leadership skills. Team leading and care of critically-ill clients are major components of this course. Students will engage in the clinical application of concepts covered in RNSG 2318, demonstrating independence and mastery of the role of an entry level Registered Nurse. Prerequisites:  RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2318, RNSG 2311. (0, 9, 3)

 

RNSG 2311: NCLEX-RN Preparation (I) This online course offers the student a comprehensive review of nursing content to help prepare them for success on the NCLEX-RN. Students will receive test-taking strategies, review theory content, and practice NCLEX-style questions. The focus of this course is to review the student on what is needed to prepare for the NCLEX-RN and to begin their role as an entry-level Registered Nurse. This course also requires that the student passes the final comprehensive exit exam. To pass the exit exam, the student must score at or above the National (North American) average. To pass this course, the student must complete the online course (50% of the grade) and pass the exit exam (other 50% of the grade). See the Graduation Policy for more details. Prerequisites:  RNSG 2216, RNSG 2223. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2318, RNSG 232. (1, 0, 1

 

SCIE 280X Special Topics in Science Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

SCMT 1013 Intro to Supply Chain Management This course is an overview of supply chain management and its role in the success of a firm. This course will expose students to topics related to design and management of supply chains, from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Course topics will include supply, operations, distribution, and integration.(3,0,3)

 

SCMT 1023 Logistics Management of logistics functions in the firm including physical distribution activities such as transportation, storage facility location, inventory control, materials handling, warehousing, and organization. (3,0,3)

 

SCMT 1113 Inventory This course explores the industrial purchasing cycle for materials acquisition and management. Students will study inventory control concepts, models for dependent and independent demand inventory control concepts, models for dependent and independent demand inventory systems, materials requirements planning systems, distribution requirements, planning techniques, and classical reorder point inventory models. Recent developments in supplier qualifications, appraisals, source selection, buying practices, value analysis, policies, and international purchasing will also be discussed. (3,0,3)

 

SCMT 1123 Transportation This course is an introduction to physical distributions interaction with transportation. The course examines forms of transportation and factors that influence transportation decisions to include regulation and public policy. (3,0,3)

 

SOCI 2003 Social Problems (II) An analysis of selected social problems and other effects on the individual and society Prerequisite: SOCI 2413 (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  SOCI 2013

 

SOCI 2013 Cultural Anthropology (Online Course; Offered on Demand) Introduces the concept of culture and cultural processes. Examines perceptions of race, gender, and ethnicity. Compares human adaptation across cultures and through time in terms of subsistence methods, social and political organization, economics, stratification, marriage and family structure, religion, kinship, and language.  Online course. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  ANTH 2013

 

SOCI 2413 Sociology (I,II,S) A study of the cultural basis of human life and social origins with concepts requisite to an understanding of the process of social institutions and the nature of social changes. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  SOCI 1013

 

SOCI 2503 Marriage and Family (I) A study of marriage, family, and kinship both cross-culturally and within the American society. Also, examined are socialization, sexuality, sex roles, types of marriages, love relationships, marital conflict, and other. (3,0,3)

 

SPAN 0003 Conversational Spanish I (I,II) Emphasis will be on learning skills that are adaptable to everyday conversation. Offered upon demand. Non-transferable. (3,0,3)

 

SPAN 0013 Conversational Spanish II (I,II) A continuation of SPAN 0003. Offered upon demand. Non-transferable. (3,0,3)  

 

SPAN 1203 Spanish I (I) This course is the first part of a two-semester college-level beginning Spanish course. The course begins with the study of simple grammar and vocabulary. Attention is placed on reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. The course also introduces students to aspects of the history, literature, art, religion, and geography of Spain and Latin America. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all academic skills coursework in English. Prerequisites: ENGL 1013(3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  SPAN 1013

 

SPAN 1303 Spanish II (II) Spanish II is the second part of a two-semester, college-level beginning Spanish course. Attention is placed on reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. As a general education course, Spanish II also introduces students to aspects of the history, literature, art, religion, and popular culture of Spain and Latin America. (3,0,3)

 ACTS Index Number:  SPAN 1023

 

SPCH 1313 Principles of Speech (I,II,S) Introduction to oral communications, covering theories and practical application emphasizing proficiency in speech organization, delivery, and critical thinking/listening applications. (3,0,3)

ACTS Index Number:  SPCH 1003

 

TECH 280X Special Topics in Technical and Industrial Professions Special Topics designation if used for courses of current interest that are not included as a permanent part of UA HOPE-TEXARKANA official course offerings. The subtitle of the course will reflect the specific subject matter. Special topics courses are not designed for transfer.

 

TECH 290X Internship This course is designed to allow a student to gain knowledge, skill, and experience while working in a position that is reflective of their educational goal(s). The student will work varying number of hours at the intern site depending upon the number of credit hours desired. This course requires the diligence of the student, overisght by the faculty advisor or divisional dean, and a high level of interaction by the intern site’s foreman or supervisor. (0,9,3) or (0,12,4)

 

WELD 1001 Welding & Electrical Safety This is a short-term course that provides instruction in basic welding safety and electrical safety precautions as related to industry. Does not count toward a degree. Offered upon demand. (1,0,1)

 

WELD 1003 Basic Welding (I,II) Students will be introduced to basic safety and welding procedures, including striking an arc, running a bead, gas safety, and simple gas welding and cutting procedures, identifying and using correct welding rods, simple brazing, and basic material properties and principles. (2,4,3)

 

WELD 1104 Pipe And Structural Fitting (I) The study of fitting structural steel as well as pipe. This course includes oxy-acetylene welding. (3,3,4)

 

WELD 1204 Introduction to Arc Welding (I) The theory and application of Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) will include the setting of equipment, selecting of electrodes, and running of beads. Practical application is provided through shop experience. (2,7,4)

 

WELD 1302 Metallurgy (I) A study of the properties and classifications of various metals. (1,2,2)

 

WELD 1306 Position Welding (II) A continuation of the study of oxy-acetylene and SMAW in cutting and welding metals in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Emphasis is on SMAW. (3,9,6)

 

WELD 1502 TIG Welding (II) A study of the theory and practice of gas tungsten arc welding, GTAW, in which the arc is established through a non-consumable electrode housed in the handle and employing helium or argon as a shielding gas. The filler metal is applied by hand by the operator. This type of welding is sometimes known as heliarc welding. (1,3,2)

 

WELD 1503 MIG Welding (II) A study of the theory and practice of gas metal arc welding, GMAW, in which the arc is established through a consumable electrode fed through the handle and employing a shielding gas. This type of welding is sometimes known as wire welding. (2,3,3)

 

WELD 1703 Spray Arc Welding (I) The theory and application of spray arc welding will include the setting of equipment, selecting of electrodes, and running of beads. This course is designed to teach specific welding skills as required by local industry. (2,4,3)

 

WELD 2001 Special Problems in Welding I Specific occupational applications for continuing study in subjects related to, but beyond the scope of other welding courses. Each application is designed according to the individual student’s need. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (0,3,1)

 

WELD 2003 Special Problems in Welding II Specific occupational applications for continuing study in subjects related to, but beyond the scope of other welding courses. Each application is designed according to the individual student’s need. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (0,9,3)